TANIA BRUGUERA

Tania Bruguera

 

CANCELLED

March 14, 12:30pm
The Depot, VCUarts
814 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23220

For over twenty-five years, Tania Bruguera (Cuban, born 1968) has created socially engaged performances and installations that examine the nature of political power structures and their effect on the lives of society’s most vulnerable individuals and groups. In Havana, Bruguera established the Arte de Conducta (Behavior Art) program at Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana in 2003 and recently opened the Hannah Arendt International Institute for Artivism, a school, exhibition space, and think tank for activist artists. Her work was included in Documenta 11 (2002) and the 2015 Venice Biennale, and has been exhibited at Tate Modern, London, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and other venues. She is the recipient of an honorary doctorate from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, a Herb Alpert Award in the Arts, a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship, and a Yale World Fellowship, and is the first artist-in-residence in the New York City Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs. This lecture is co-organized by The Department of Painting and Printmaking at VCUarts and the ICA at VCU. Bruguera’s project The School of Arte Arte Útil is included in the inaugural exhibition of the ICA entitled Declaration.

FOUNTAINHEAD FELLOWS EXHIBITION

Fountainhead Fellows exhibition: Ryan Lucero, Jeanne Medina,and Sara Stern

March 16 – April 27, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday, March 16, 7 – 9 pm

Reynolds Gallery
1514 West Main Street
Richmond, Virginia 23220

Reynolds Gallery presents the 2017-2018 VCU Fountainhead Fellows’ exhibitions, presenting work by Ryan Lucero (Painting+Printmaking), Jeanne Medina (Craft+Material Studies), and Sara Stern (Sculpture+Extended Media). Lucero balances delicacy and rawness in his repetitively patterned paintings, capturing a haunting beauty in his show Jumping from an Imaginary Explosion. In Ancestral Offerings, Medina weaves together materials from various cultures, presenting themes of decolonization and identity through monochromatic textiles works. Through video, performance, and installations, Stern overlaps digital and physical spaces in Foundation Vent, dissecting established social and political systems.

 

 

TSCHABALALA SELF

Tschabalala Self

March 20, 2:30 pm
The Depot, VCUarts
814 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23220

Tschabalala Self is a New Haven based painter whose work is concerned with the iconographic significance of the Black female body in contemporary culture. Her work explores the emotional, physical and psychological impact of the Black female body as icon, and is primarily devoted to examining the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality. Her work was recently included in Trigger. Gender as a Tool and a Weapon at the New Museum. Selected current and recent exhibitions include: Tschabalala Self, Tramway, Glasgow (2017); Tschabalala Self, Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art, London (2017); Desire, Moore Building, Miami (2016); The Function, T293, Naples (2016); A Constellation, Studio Museum Harlem, Harlem (2015); Tropicana, The Cabin, Los Angeles (2015). She received her B.A. from Bard College in 2012 and her M.F.A. from the Yale School of Art in 2015.

 

KHALED JARRAR

Khaled Jarrar

March 30, 2:30pm
FAB 301 – The Fishbowl
1000 West Broad St.
Richmond, VA 23220

Born in Jenin in 1976, Khaled Jarrar lives and works in Ramallah, Palestine. Jarrar graduated from the International Academy of Art Palestine with a Bachelor in Visual Arts degree in 2011. The following year, his documentary The Infiltrators (2012) won several accolades at the 9th Annual Dubai International Film Festival, and confirmed his importance in global cinema. Recently, Jarrar was awarded the 2017 General Grants program for Cinema by the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture for his film Displaced in Heaven, a documentary that follows an exiled Palestinian family fleeing Syria. Jarrar’s solo exhibitions include Ayyam Gallery Al Quoz, Dubai (2016); Art Bartsch & Cie, Geneva (2015); Galerie Polaris, Paris (2014, 2012); Gallery One, Ramallah (2014); Ayyam Gallery London (2013); Galerie Guy Bartschi, Geneva (2013); and the NEWTOPIA: The State of Human Rights Contemporary Arts in Mechelen and Brussels (2012). His group exhibitions were held at venues such as Whitechapel Gallery, London (2017);  Diverse Works, Houston (2017); The Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations (MuCEM), Marseille (2017); Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, New York (2017); 57th Venice Biennale, Venice (2017); Institut Du Monde Arabe, Paris (2017); La Triennale di Milano (2017); Brentwood Arts Exchange, Maryland (2017); Hinterland Gallery, Vienna (2016); Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris (2016); Aga Khan Museum, Toronto (2016); Palais De La Culture, Constantine (2015); Pirineos Sur Festival (2015); Maraya Art Centre, Sharjah (2015); New Museum, New York City (2014), Kashya Hildebrand Gallery, London (2014), University of Applied Arts, Vienna (2014), USF Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa (2013); The Madrid Palestine Film Festival, Madrid (2013); 15th Jakarta Biennale (2013); 7th Berlin Biennale (2012); 52nd October Salon, Belgrade (2011); Al-Ma’mal Foundation, Jerusalem (2010); and London Film Festival (2010).

 

MFA Open Studios

 

MFA Open Studios

Feb 2, 2018, 6 – 8 PM
Fine Arts Building
1000 W Broad St.
Sculpture & Extended Media, Kinetic Imaging, Craft, Painting & Printmaking

Aliza Nisenbaum

Aliza Nisenbaum

Feb 15, 2:30pm
The Depot, VCUarts
814 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23220

 Aliza Nisenbaum (b. 1977, Mexico City) has presented her paintings in solo shows at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Mary Mary, Glasgow; White Columns, New York; Lulu, Mexico City; Julius Caesar, Chicago; and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago. National and International group exhibitions have included the Whitney Biennial 2017; The Flag Art Foundation; The ICA at MECA, Maine; Biennial of the Americas, MCA, Denver; the Rufino Tamayo Painting Biennial, Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City; T-293 gallery, Rome; Hannah Hoffman Gallery LA; Gallerie Nachst St. Stephen Rosemary Shwartzwalder, Austria; Wilkinson Gallery, London; Slopes Gallery, Melbourne, Australia; Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Venice; Princeton University School of Architecture; The Renaissance Society, Chicago; Green Gallery, Yale School of Art; The Poor Farm, Wisconsin; The University of Wisconsin; and The University of Texas at Tyler, among others. She has curated an exhibition named “Intimisms” at James Cohan Gallery in 2016.

Aliza lives and works in New York, and is currently Director of Graduate Studies, and Professor of Visual Arts at Columbia University School of the Arts. She received her BFA and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She  has been an artist in residence at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, The Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program; Lower Manhattan Cultural Council; Artist-in-Residence at the University of Tennessee; and SOMA Summer, Mexico City. Fellowships and grants include the Rema Hort Mann NYC award, and the Fellowship for Immigrant Women Leaders from NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA). She has also been a participating artist at Immigrant Movement International, Corona Park, Queens. She has been widely reviewed, and is included in the book Vitamin P3, New Perspectives in Painting.

Laurie Jo Reynolds

Laurie Jo Reynolds

Feb 21, 12:00pm
VCU Student Commons
907 Floyd Avenue
Richmond, VA 23220

Laurie Jo Reynolds is an artist, policy advocate, and researcher who has dedicated two decades of work to addressing the negative representations of people in prison. Her “Legislative Art” participates and intervenes in government systems, with the goal of concrete political change. Reynolds has focused on Tamms Correctional Center, the notorious supermax prison in southern Illinois designed for sensory deprivation. In 2007, she collaborated with former and current inmates at Tamms, their families, and other artists to launch Tamms Year Ten, a volunteer grassroots legislative campaign seeking to reform or close the prison. Tamms supermax—which came to symbolize our increasingly punitive, dehumanizing, and counter-productive criminal justice system—was shuttered on January 4, 2013, in part due to Reynolds’s efforts. The campaign featured relentless lobbying and cultural projects, such as Photo Requests from Solitary, which invited men in isolation to request a photograph of anything, real or imagined. Her previous work includes the 2007 cult classic Space Ghost, an experimental video depicting a series of telephone calls from prison juxtaposed with found footage of astronauts and prisoners; and ASK ME!, a 2001 installation that placed Tamms family members and others affected by the prison system behind wooden booths to facilitate conversations with gallery visitors. As a 2010 Soros Justice Fellow, Reynolds researched and advocated for best practices to stop sexual abuse and reduce crime recidivism. She produced cultural events and conceptual art objects as part of an education program to open dialogue about the unintended consequences of the public sex-offender registry and residency restrictions. Reynolds was awarded a 2013 Creative Capital grant for the Honey Bun Comedy Hour, a video and performance variety show depicting the horror, boredom, and small mercies of prison life. The work was named after a packaged dessert that is one of the rare joys in prison, but which also constitutes an addiction and a form of currency. Individual segments from this work will be shown to decision makers as part of targeted campaigns for policy change.

Basim Magdy

Basim Magdy

lecture: Nov 6, 2:30pm

The Depot
814 West Broad St.
Richmond, VA 23220


Basim Magdy was born in 1977 in Assiut, Egypt, and lives and works in Basel and Cairo. His work appeared recently in solo and group exhibitions at Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-On-Hudson, New York; Arnolfini, Bristol, UK; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Castello di Rivoli, Torino; Mathaf, Doha (2017) MCA Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, MAXXI National Museum of the 21st Century Arts, Rome; Jeu de Paume, Paris; CAPC Museum of Contemporary Art, Bordeaux; Deutsche Bank KunstHalle, Berlin; Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-On-Hudson, New York; Salt Ulus, Ankara; Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah, UAE; Whitechapel Gallery, London (2016); MoMA The Museum of Modern Art, New York; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; The New Museum Triennial, New Museum, New York; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw, Warsaw; HOME, Manchester, UK; The Green Parrot, Barcelona; Lismore Castle Arts, Lismore, Ireland (2015); La Biennale de Montreal, Montreal; Art in General, New York; Monash University Museum of Art | MUMA, Melbourne, Australia; MEDIACITY Seoul Biennial, Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul; Passerelle Centre d’art contemporain, Brest; CRAC Alsace, Altkirch (2014); 13th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul; Centre Culturel Suisse, Paris; Sharjah Biennial 11, Sharjah, UAE; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; The High Line, New York (2013); Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin; La Triennale: Intense Proximity, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012); Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2011); Mass MOCA, North Adams, USA and Ateliers de Rennes – Biennale dʼart contemporain, Rennes, (2010). He was shortlisted for the Future Generation Art Prize, Kiev (2012) and won the Abraaj Art Prize, Dubai and the New:Vision Award, CPH:DOX Film Festival, Copenhagen (2014) and the Experimental Award at the Curtas Vila do Conde – International Film Festival, Portugal (2015), Deutsche Bank’s 2016 Artist of the Year (2016).

 

This lecture is co-sponsored with the Dept. of Sculpture and Extended Media

 

Galit Eilat

Galit Eilat

lecture: Nov 9, 2:30pm


Fishbowl
1000 W Broad St, Room 301
Richmond, VA 23220

Galit Eilat founded, and directed from 2001 to 2010, the Israeli Center for Digital Arts in Holon, which under her leadership became one of the pre-eminent sites for genuine collaborations between Israeli and Palestinian artists, as well as with art organizations from the Near East, former Eastern European bloc, and the Balkans. In 2004, she co founded Maarav, an online arts and culture magazine, which she went on to edit until 2010. She was part of the team that developed a series of traveling seminars entitled “Liminal Spaces” (2006–09), which aspired primarily to establish an absent but essential platform for joint work, action, and dialogue between the Israeli and Palestinian art communities. Between 2010 and 2013, she collaborated with the Van Abbemuseum on several projects, including Play VanAbbe, Picasso in Palestine, and the collection presentation. She served as artistic director of the Akademie der Künste der Welt, in Cologne, from 2012–13. She has curated and co curated many exhibitions, including the Polish Pavilion in Venice Biennale (2011), 32nd October Salon Belgrade (2011), and she was a member of the 31st Sao Paulo Bienal curatorial team between 2013–15, and involved in projects from Kosovo, Ljubljana, Turkey, Poland, and elsewhere. She has taught and lectured in a range of universities, museums, and galleries, and has written extensively about art and politics. She is the 2017-18 Keith Haring Fellow in Art and Activism at Bard College.

 

Alternative Endings, Racial Beginnings

ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS

Anderson Gallery

VCUarts
907 1/2 W. Franklin Street
Richmond, Virginia 23284

Newly commissioned videos by Mykki Blanco, Cheryl Dunye & Ellen Spiro, Reina Gossett, Thomas Allen Harris, Kia Labeija, Tiona Nekkia McClodden and Brontez Purnell premiering on World AIDS Day 2017.

ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS is the 28th annual iteration of Visual AIDS’ longstanding Day With(out) Art project. Curated by Erin Christovale and Vivian Crockett for Visual AIDS, the video program prioritizes Black narratives within the ongoing AIDS epidemic, commissioning seven new and innovative short videos from artists Mykki Blanco, Cheryl Dunye & Ellen Spiro, Reina Gossett, Thomas Allen Harris, Kia Labeija, Tiona Nekkia McClodden and Brontez Purnell.

In spite of the impact of HIV/AIDS within Black communities, these stories and experiences are constantly excluded from larger artistic and historical narratives. In 2016 African Americans represented 44% of all new HIV diagnoses in the United States. Given this context, it is increasingly urgent to feature a myriad of stories that consider and represent the lives of those housed within this statistic. ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS seeks to highlight the voices of those that are marginalized within broader Black communities nationwide, including queer and trans people.

The commissioned projects include intimate meditations of young HIV positive protagonists; a consideration of community-based HIV/AIDS activism in the South; explorations of the legacies and contemporary resonances within AIDS archives; a poetic journey through New York exploring historical traces of queer and trans life, and more. Together, the videos provide a platform centering voices deeply impacted by the ongoing epidemic.