Curriculum

MFA Program Curriculum


First Semester

PAPR 605 Graduate Painting/Printmaking  (6 credits)
PAPR 591 Critical Issues  (3 credits)
PAPR 527 Art and Critical Theory (3 credits)
PAPR 690 Graduate Seminar  (3 credits)

Second Semester
PAPR 605 Graduate Painting/Printmaking  (6 credits)
PAPR 528 Art and Critical Theory (3 credits)
PAPR 690 Graduate Seminar  (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)

Third Semester
PAPR 605 Graduate Painting/Printmaking (6 credits)
PAPR 690 Graduate Seminar  (3 credits)
PAPR 591 Professional Practices for Fine Artists (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)

Fourth Semester
PAPR 605 Graduate Painting/Printmaking Studio
PAPR 690 Graduate Seminar  (3 credits)
Academic Elective (3 credits)
Studio Elective (3 credits)

 

Descriptions of Required Courses

PAPR 690 Graduate Seminar
Bi-weekly seminar led by a visiting faculty member for the purpose of discussing recent artistic developments in painting and printmaking.

PAPR 605 Graduate Painting/Printmaking
Degree requirement for graduate students in the Department of Painting + Printmaking.  Emphasis is placed on individual research and studio practice with regular feedback from faculty.

PAPR 591 Critical Issues
Degree requirement for 1st semester graduate students in Departments Painting + Printmaking and Sculpture + Extended Media. This course examines diverse critical and aesthetic issues as they pertain to a select group of highly innovative, genre-bending international artists. Related readings include canonical art historical texts and contemporary art criticism, fiction and fact.

PAPR 591 Professional Practices for Fine Artists (open to students in Painting + Printmaking, Sculpture + Extended Media, and Photo/Film)
This course prepares the graduate student for professional rigors to come. Guest specialists address various dimensions of the art world.

PAPR 527, 528  Art and Critical Theory
Major themes in art criticism and theory from 1940 to the present. This course provides an introduction to the literature of art criticism as well as artists’ writings in relation to studio production.