2015 MFA Thesis Exhibitions

Sarah Baugh, MFA 2015

Oasis Link, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Directed Thesis Research in Visual Communications, 2015, with Nicole Killian.

Surfaces disrupt the temporal and spatial aspect of images, but also act as sites for their reassembly and unification. The act of narration is no longer recounting a series of connected events, but the observation, participation, performance, and creation of these events.

Open/Close, MFA Thesis Exhibition
Open/Close, MFA Thesis Exhibition

Alex Bruno, MFA 2015

Open/Close, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Directed Thesis Research in Visual Communications, 2015, with Lauren Thorson.

My research focuses on a practice of working within strict sets of rules and boundaries to create visual-audio work.This visual-audio work not only communicates a concept or idea, but also lives as a research artifact of my design processes.

Tracing Motion, MFA Thesis Exhibition
Tracing Motion, MFA Thesis Exhibition

Stephanie Clark, MFA 2015

Tracing Motion, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Directed Thesis Research in Visual Communications, 2015, with Jamie Mahoney.

This document explores the use of motion within design to defamiliarize a message. The objective is to expand a viewer’s level of understanding through prolonged perception. I experiment with this idea using present-day tools which afford my own movement during the capturing process to create various visual interpretations of motion.

Graphic Hybridity, MFA Thesis Exhibition
Graphic Hybridity, MFA Thesis Exhibition

Yaeyoung Park, MFA 2015

Graphic Hybridity, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Directed Thesis Research in Visual Communications, 2015, with David Shields.

Hybridity is the result when visual form, color or tools interact. While not every combination of multiple elements result in success, I believe creativity, intuition and serendipity determines the successful hybridity. This work is a documentation of my journey to develop a personal definition of successful hybridity in graphic design.

Installation, MFA Thesis Exhibition
Poly-cultural Interactions, MFA Thesis Exhibition

Xi Lu, MFA 2015

Poly-cultural Interactions, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Directed Thesis Research in Visual Communications, 2015, with Roy McKelvey.

My research examines how poly-culturalism affects aspects of communications among people who hold a multiplicity of voices. It uses my personal experiences as the basis for work that expresses the effects of mistranslation and cultural mixing and seeks to communicate them to people of various cultural backgrounds.