Jina Seo

Jina Seo is an artist, a maker, and an educator. Her practice explores the relationships between body, clothing, sexuality, fetish, and space. She received her MFA in Studio Art/Metal at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2016 and BFA in Metalwork and Jewelry Design at the Kookmin University at Seoul, South Korea in 2012. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including Brooklyn Metal works, Brooklyn, NY; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, IL; Sung-Gock Gallery, Seoul, Korea; and (AV17) Gallery, Vilnius, Lithuania. She was a Gold Award recipient for the ITAMI International Craft Exhibition in 2010 and currently is a Fountainhead fellow at the Virginia Commonwealth University in 2016-2017.

Mei-Ling Israel

Mei-Ling Israel is a researcher, writer and glass artist based in Brooklyn NY. Her interests include material culture, ethnography, digital cultural heritage management, popular culture and media studies. Her dissertation, “Circles, Pins and Threads: Craft Communities in the Digital Sphere,” explores the capacity of online interfaces for self-organization, extra-institutional learning, and the transmission of traditions. She holds a BA from Stanford University in Modern Thought and Literature and her Stanford thesis, Seeking the Phoenix: Artistic Consciousness in the Nuclear Age is part of the collection of the Museum of Modern Art library. She trained in glass making at Penland School of Crafts and Urban Glass. Prior to coming to BGC she published monographs in the fields of craft, immigrant culture, and contemporary art. She has presented her research at the Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, the Paley Center for Media, the Hagley Museum & Library in Philadelphia, the American Popular Culture Association, the University of Alberta Material Culture Institute, and the National Conference for Education in the Ceramic Arts. Her contributions are part of the Bard Graduate Center Focus Gallery exhibition catalogs Objects of Exchange: Social and Material Transformation on the Late Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast (2011) andChristmas Cards in America (2011). At the completion of her doctorate Mei-Ling is looking forward to applying her research to the preservation of cultural heritage via digital media desig

Heather MacKenzie

Heather MacKenzie is an artist, writer, and educator currently living in Richmond, Virginia, as the Fountainhead Fellow in Craft and Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. In her work, Heather looks to the textile as a foundational piece of human technology that is sensual and material while simultaneously embedded with complex mathematical information. In two- and three-dimensional work, as well as performance, she examines other, equally foundational systems that span the material world and the abstract one: platonic mathematics, Euclidean geometry, and standardized measurement. For the academic year of 2014-15, Heather was a Fulbright Fellow in Paris, France, where she produced work and had a solo installation as artist-in-residence at l’École des Arts Décoratifs. She has studied traditional textiles in Ecuador, Ghana, India, Zimbabwe, as well as in Europe, and she has exhibited work recently at venues including the Mission Gallery and Rhona Hoffman Gallery in Chicago, and PointDom in Toulouse, France. Heather received her BA from Brown University and her MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

Caroline Hannah

Caroline M. Hannah is a design historian and a PhD candidate at the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design, Material Culture, New York, where she also earned her MA and MPhil. Her dissertation, Henry Varnum Poor, Crow House, Craft, and Design, explores Poor’s shift from painting to other kinds of making, including his seminal ceramics, in the period between the First and Second World Wars. In support of her doctoral work, she has received fellowships and grants from the Bard Graduate Center; the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; and The Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery. A co-founder of the Henry Varnum Poor Foundation (a k a Friends of Crow House), she is working to preserve Poor’s hand-built home and studio of 50 years. She lectures frequently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and has taught at Parsons, the New School for Design in New York, and at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.  She previously held positions at the New-York Historical Society; Historical Design, Inc.; and the Yale University Art Gallery and has contributed to several museum exhibition catalogs, including Crafting Modernism: Midcentury American Art and Design for the Museum of Arts and Design, New York (Yale, 2011).

 

Crow House
Crow House

Crow House

Henry Varnum Poor (1887-1970) building Crow House, 1920, Rockland County, New York. Photographer unknown. Henry Varnum Poor Papers, Archives of American Art.

Staircase
Staircase

Staircase

Crow House Staircase designed and made by Henry Varnum Poor out of tulip poplar in 1931Photograph by Elizabeth Felicella, 2006.

Crow House
Crow House

Crow House

Crow House, Home and Studio of Henry Varnum Poor, Rockland County, New York. Photograph by Elizabeth Felicella, 2006.

Henry Varnum Poor’s hand-painted ceramic tile bathroom
Henry Varnum Poor’s hand-painted ceramic tile bathroom

Henry Varnum Poor’s hand-painted ceramic tile bathroom

Henry Varnum Poor’s hand-painted ceramic tile bathroom for the 1928 American Designers’ Gallery Exhibition illustrated in Paul T. Frankl’s Form and Re-form: A Practical Handbook of Modern Interiors (1930).

Bather
Bather

Bather

Bather plate, earthenware painted with metal-oxide enamels under a lead glaze. 1924. Collection of Martin Eidelberg.

Woodblock print depicting Henry Varnum Poor and Marion Dorn
Woodblock print depicting Henry Varnum Poor and Marion Dorn

Woodblock print depicting Henry Varnum Poor and Marion Dorn

Woodblock print depicting Henry Varnum Poor and Marion Dorn with Crow House in the background, 1920-22. Henry Varnum Poor Papers, Archives of American Art.

Heather McCalla

Heather McCalla is originally from San Diego, California, where she studied furniture design and woodworking while attending San Diego State University. She obtained her BA in Applied Design in 2006, and worked as a finish carpenter and independent designer for three years before moving to Wisconsin in 2010. McCalla received her MFA from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2013, where she subsequently lectured in the furniture design and woodworking department before moving to Richmond, Virginia to become a Fountainhead Fellow. Her work has been exhibited extensively across the US, including exhibitions at both the Neuberger Museum of Art in New York and the Haggerty Museum of Art in Wisconsin. Through the use of recognizable domestic objects, architectural forms, and outmoded construction techniques, her work explores the complex feelings and relationships associated with home and family.

 

 

Sarah Nance

Sarah Nance is an American artist working in installation, drawing and sculpture. Natural light occupies a central role in her work, as it is intimately related to considerations of perception, beauty and ephemerality. In 2013, Nance participated in consecutive artist residencies in Reykjavík and Skagaströnd, Iceland. She completed her MFA at the University of Oregon and is currently a Fountainhead Fellow in Craft & Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University.

K.L.H. Wells

Fleur du Mexique a tapestry by Fernand Léger, at the Atelier Cavalaire, 1952
Fleur du Mexique a tapestry by Fernand Léger, at the Atelier Cavalaire, 1952

Fleur du Mexique a tapestry by Fernand Léger, at the Atelier Cavalaire, 1952

Jacqueline de la Baume-Dürrbach and René Dürrbach working on Fleur du Mexique, a tapestry by Fernand Léger, at the Atelier Cavalaire, 1952. Jacqueline de la Baume-Dürrbach Papers, Célérier-Dürrbach Family Archive, Dijon, France.

Tyrol Sends Rug to Pres. Truman
Tyrol Sends Rug to Pres. Truman

Tyrol Sends Rug to Pres. Truman

"Tyrol Sends Rug to Pres. Truman," United States Information Service (Vienna, Austria), 1951.

Weaving Workshop, Bauhaus Dessau, c. 1927-1929
Weaving Workshop, Bauhaus Dessau, c. 1927-1929

Weaving Workshop, Bauhaus Dessau, c. 1927-1929

View of the weaving workshop, Bauhaus Dessau, c. 1927-1929. Photograph no. 6935, Bauhaus Archiv, Berlin.

Gloria F. Ross in her New York Studio,
Gloria F. Ross in her New York Studio,

Gloria F. Ross in her New York Studio,

Gloria F. Ross in her New York Studio, with tapestries by Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler, 1970.

National Gallery of Art East Building
National Gallery of Art East Building

National Gallery of Art East Building

Ezra Stoller (photographer), National Gallery of Art East Building, with tapestry by Joan Miro, 1978.

Le Corbusier working on a tapestry cartoon
Le Corbusier working on a tapestry cartoon

Le Corbusier working on a tapestry cartoon

Le Corbusier working on a tapestry cartoon, from Zodiac 7 (1960).

Wells earned a B.A. from Barnard College and an M.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, both in art history. She has contributed research to curatorial projects at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the Milwaukee Art Museum, and most recently to the Pacific Standard Time exhibition at the Getty Center. Her publications include “Artistes contre Liciers: La Renaissance de la Tapisserie Française,” in Decorum (Paris: Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris and Skira Flammarion, 2013); “Serpentine Sideboards, Hogarth’s Analysis, and the Beautiful Self,” Eighteenth Century Studies (Spring 2013); and “Curating the Cultural Landscape: Chipstone House as Historical Property,” The International Journal of the Inclusive Museum (2009). Her dissertation, Tapestry and Tableau: Revival, Reproduction, and the Marketing of Modernism, enables a new understanding of international modernism by exploring the close relationship between modernist painting and tapestry in the decades following World War II.

 

 

Olivia Valentine

Olivia Valentine creates architectural scale textile installations exhibited nationally and internationally.  Recent solo exhibitions have included Panorama at Pasajist in Istanbul and 1:1 at Happy Collaborationists Exhibition Space in Chicago.  Olivia received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2010 and her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. Recent awards include a Fulbright Fellowship for Installation Art in Turkey (2012-13) and the Brandford Elliott Award for excellence in Fiber Arts (2012)  She is also the co-director of Flash Atölye, which recently took the form of a project space in a commercial arcade in İzmir, Turkey, producing community-based projects with both Turkish and American artists.

Jaydan Moore

Jaydan Moore’s career began as an undergraduate student at California College of the Arts, Oakland, where he earned his BFA in jewelry and metal arts. During his time there, he focused on the production of oil cans and their representation of craft and the Industrial Revolution.

At the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he earned his MFA/MA in art, Jaydan began focusing his interest on the heirloom. Using the imagery of found silver-plated tableware, he fragments and reassembles these objects into new forms to challenge and commemorate the individual’s ability to designate value to/ his her own valuables and memories. By fabricating a new object from stylistically and historically related wares, he creates a new image that takes all memories of its use into consideration, maintaining some semblance and evidence of their past incarnations.

Last year Jaydan was an artist in resident at Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, where he continued these themes in new work for shows at Brooklyn Metal Works, in Brooklyn, NY, and the Overture Gallery in Madison, WI. During his time at VCU he will be working on an  exhibition that will to be held in Richmond. For more information, visit www.jaydanmoore.com

Kate Hampel

Kate Hampel holds an MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from Concordia University in Montreal. Her work is interdisciplinary and is concerned with gender, power, and taboo.

Kate was a 2012-13 Fountainhead Fellow at Virginia Commonwealth University.